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Re:


oh yes, I know placate.
I like this thread Susan..

come on Marjie! emoticon

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I am re reading the Celestine books

synchonisity... I like that word,, have I spelt it correctly.. or should that be spelled?

spelt is a kind of flour innit?

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Re: Fabulous new words . . . or old words


Officinal

 
adjective | uh-FISS-uh-nul
 
Definition:
tending or used to cure disease or relieve pain : medicinal



Did You Know?
 
Officinal is a word applied in medicine to plants and herbs that are used in medicinal preparations. For most of the 19th century, it was the standard word used by the United States Pharmacopeia to refer to the drugs, chemicals, and medicinal preparations that they recognized, but by the 1870s it was replaced by official in this context. Despite this supersession, you still can find a healthy dose of officinal in the pharmaceutical field, where it is used today as a word describing preparations that are regularly kept in stock at pharmacies. Officinal was derived from the Medieval Latin noun officina, a word for the storeroom of a monastery in which provisions and medicines were kept. In Latin, officina means "workshop."
 

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oh never heard of that word Susan

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deride

de·ride
dəˈrīd/Submit
verb
3rd person present: derides
express contempt for; ridicule.
"critics derided the proposals as clumsy attempts to find a solution"
synonyms: ridicule, mock, scoff at, jibe at, make fun of, poke fun at, laugh at, hold up to ridicule.

I have been reading this all [sign in to see URL] had to look it up, I've never heard it. emoticon

Nanny, I could NOT have spelled your word! emoticon
But I looked it up, because I KNOW that one! emoticon

Synchronicity (German: Synchronizität) is a concept, first introduced by analytical psychologist Carl Jung, which holds that events are "meaningful coincidences" if they occur with no causal relationship yet seem to be meaningfully related

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Deride! I have heard of that one and basically knew what it meant but would have been afraid to try it in conversation

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synchronicity
noun syn·chro·nic·i·ty ˌsiŋ-krə-ˈni-sə-tē , ˌsin-

1 : the quality or fact of being synchronous
2 : the coincidental occurrence of events and especially psychic events (such as similar thoughts in widely separated persons or a mental image of an unexpected event before it happens) that seem related but are not explained by conventional mechanisms of causality —used especially in the psychology of C. G. Jung


Did You Know?
It happens to everyone sooner or later: A certain number pops up wherever you go; an old friend you haven't seen in 20 years since high school appears the same day you're looking at her picture in a yearbook; you're singing a song and turn on the radio - and the same song is playing. Such coincidences, here described by Thomas Ropp in the Arizona Republic, March 29,1999, are examples of synchronicity. The concept is linked to the psychology of Carl Jung. Jung didn't coin the word (the "simultaneousness" sense of "synchronicity" was already in use), but he gave it special importance in his writings. Jung believed that such "meaningful coincidences" play an important role in our lives. Today, some people even look to synchronicities for spiritual guidance.



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I know deride.

I love synchronisty!

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cohort
 
noun | KOH-hort
 
Definition
 
1 :
companion, colleague
 
2
a :
band, group
 
b :
a group of individuals having a statistical factor (such as age or class membership) in common in a demographic study
 
c :
one of 10 divisions of an ancient Roman legion
 
d :
a group of warriors or soldiers




Did You Know?
 
In ancient times, a cohort was a military unit, one of ten divisions in a Roman legion. The term passed into English in the 15th century, when it was used in translations and writings about Roman history. Once cohort became established in our language, its meaning was extended, first to refer to any body of troops, then to any group of individuals with something in common, and later to a single companion. Some usage commentators have objected to this last sense because it can be hard to tell whether the plural refers to different individuals or different groups. The "companion" sense is well established in standard use, however, and its meaning is clear enough in such sentences as "her cohorts came along with her to the game."


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This is a word I know and use.

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cohorts, well I would have used that in a derisory way

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I always think of a cohort as a partner in crime. CJ would probably be my cohort. emoticon

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Financial and synchronicity are both new to me.

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grotty

I heard this on BBC tv this am.

I thought it was more of a slang word, and was going to say as such.. that lots of slang words my gks do not understand..

apparently it may not be termed as slang.


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Re: Fabulous new words . . . or old words


quote:

Lucy Ashes wrote:
Financial and synchronicity are both new to me.


Lucy, did you mean "Officinal?"

I'm sure you must have heard of the word, "Financial." Perhaps, a spellcheck type program "fixed" the word for you?

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Re:


Ten Words For Snow - ]HERE


Sposh

Definition: soft slushy mud or snow

Sposh is thought to be a combination of the words slush and posh, but before you get overly excited about the new factoid with which you plan on boring your in-laws to tears, there are a couple of things you should know. First, posh does not itself come from "port-outward-starboard-home," or any other acronym. Second, the posh that sposh is based on is a totally different kind of than the one meaning "fashionable"; this one is an archaic word, meaning “a slushy mass (as of mud or broken ice).

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Blizzard

Definition: a long severe snowstorm

Every time there is a blizzard, or even the chance that a blizzard might stop by for a visit, the event will be accompanied by a host of people who will insist on informing you that in order for it to really be a blizzard there must be at least three hours of snow with winds reaching 35 MPH, and visibility of a quarter mile or less. These conditions are necessary before the National Weather Service in the United States will call something a blizzard; however, for the rest of us, a somewhat less strict definition applies. Blizzard may be applied to such events as “a long severe snowstorm,” “an intensely strong cold wind filled with fine snow,” or figurative uses such as “an overwhelming rush.”

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Onding

Definition: a heavy fall of rain or snow

Suppose there’s been a heavy snowfall, but it has not met the strict criteria necessary to be called a blizzard by the National Weather Service, and suppose you are the sort of person who cares about such things…well, what do you call that snowfall (other than inconvenient)? You may call it an onding, a lovely regionalism that has been in use in Scotland and Northern England since the middle of the 18th century.

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Skift

Definition: a light fall of snow or rain

Tho there’s not enough snow for a drift,
Just enough has fell that you’re miffed;
Your boss makes you work
(why, the nerve of that jerk)
As he says that it’s naught but a skift.

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Graupel

Definition: granular snow pellets

Graupel, which is sometimes also referred to as soft hail, comes to English from German, in which language it is the diminutive of the word for “pearl barley” (Graupe). The word appears to have begun being used in the 1870s, when meteorologists of that time decided that there was a need to distinguish between different kinds of hail.

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Névé

Definition: the partially compacted granular snow that forms the surface part of the upper end of a glacier; broadly : a field of granular snow

Névé is indeed snow, although it is of a more particular kind than just “cold white stuff” (and it is also occasionally called firn). The word comes from a word in the Swiss dialect of French, and, prior to that, comes from the Latin word for snow (nix). Our language has used this Latin root to form a large number of words for snow-related things, although most of them are quite obscure. We have niveous (“resembling snow”), subnivean (“situated or occurring under the snow”), and ninguid (defined by Thomas Blount in 1656 as “where much Snow is”).

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Firnification

Definition: the process whereby snow is changed to névé

Many of the words relating to snow in the English language are short little things, which has doubtless caused some of you to wonder when the fancy words will arrive. Well, firnification is the two dollar word you’ve been looking for. It may be several years before you have an opportunity to use it in the correct context, but just imagine how happy you will be when you find yourself standing on the upper end of a glacier while the snow is actively turning to névé.

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Grue

Definition: thin floating ice: snow

There are several meanings of grue, and the obscurity of each makes one wonder how such a pleasant and useful term should have fallen by the linguistic wayside. In addition to having the definition above, grue may function as a verb, meaning “to shiver or shudder, especially with fear or cold,” and with a number of additional noun senses, including “a fit of shivering” and “gruesome quality or effect.”

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Corn snow

Definition: granular snow formed by alternate thawing and freezing

Corn snow is also referred to as spring snow, and occasionally simply as corn. It is one of the more recent additions to our vocabulary of snow types, beginning to be used (mainly in describing ski conditions) in the early 20th century.

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Sleet

Definition: a mixture or combination of rain and snow

Sleet is basically the ambivert of weather systems. Go on ... you know you want to go look up what ambivert is.

Last edited by Susa, 1/17/2018, 1:56 pm


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sleet, blizzard, and slush, and not forgetting Snow...emoticon
are the only words I have ever heard of...

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I've heard of all but..."Onding, Neve, Firnification". Those are all new to me! emoticon

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Sue emoticon That must have been the spell checker! Of course, I know financial, but not officinal. Spellcheck still wants to change it.

Skift, I had never heard of until meeting our friend Bill. He calls it skiff.

I ran across indices in the book I was reading yesterday and checked the Kindle dictionary to find that it is plural for index.

Looking online I found a site that has so much to say about it. ]LINK

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I did not know that indices is the plural of index!

I have also always said a skiff of snow. I was surprised to read it is supposed to be skift. Therefore, I just looked it up and skiff is also correct.

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extenuate

 
verb | ik-STEN-yuh-wayt
 
Definition
 
1 :
to lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent of by making partial excuses : mitigate
 
2 :
to lessen the strength or effect of


Did You Know?
 
You have probably encountered the phrase "extenuating circumstances," which is one of the more common ways that this word turns up in modern times. Extenuate was borrowed into English in the late Middle Ages from Latin extenuatus, the past participle of the verb extenuare, which was itself formed by combining ex- and the verb tenuare, meaning "to make thin." In addition to the surviving senses, extenuate once meant "to make light of" and "to make thin or emaciated"; although those senses are now obsolete, the connection to tenuare can be traced somewhat more clearly through them. Extenuate is today mostly at home in technical and legal contexts, but it occasionally appears in general writing with what may be a developing meaning: "to prolong, worsen, or exaggerate." This meaning, which is likely due to a conflation with extend or accentuate (or both), is not yet fully established.

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I have heard of "extenuating circumstances"...but honestly not heard Extenuate on it's own... emoticon

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yes, I know of indices,,but not sure that I would use it.

and also extenuating circumstances etc...

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leonine
 
adjective | LEE-uh-nyne
 
Definition

of, relating to, suggestive of, or resembling a lion



Did You Know?
 
Leonine derives from Latin leo, meaning "lion," which in turn comes from Greek leōn. Leōn gave us an interesting range of words: leopard
 (which derives from leōn combined with pardos, a Greek word for a panther-like animal); dandelion
 (which came by way of the Anglo-French phrase dent de lion—literally, "lion's tooth"); and chameleon
 (which combines leōn with the Greek chamai, meaning "on the ground"); as well as the names Leo, Leon, and Leonard. But the dancer's and gymnast's leotard
 is not named for its wearer's cat-like movements. Rather, it was simply named after its inventor, Jules Leotard, a 19th-century French aerial gymnast.


Examples of LEONINE
 
"Jamie has a leonine aspect, with a high clear brow and soft curls eddying over his ears and along his collar."
— Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Harper's, March 2009
 
"You're a kid; you want to escape. Maybe to Edwardian
 England, maybe to an island of dancing lemurs, maybe through the rear of a magical wardrobe into a land of snow and ice waiting for a leonine king to bring back the sun."
— Lawrence Toppman, The Charlotte Observer, 9 Mar. 2017




My mother's name was Leona and her parents must have really liked that name because the next boy was named Leonard.

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Not heard that one either. But it is beautiful in both the sound of it and the meaning.. emoticon

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I did know leonine because it is sometimes used to describe someone's appearance. That is in books, not in conversations with people.

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same with me [sign in to see URL] sounding word...

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Brian used this word in a game so I had to look it up. Probably not one I am going to use.

Lysosome

A lysosome is a membrane-bound organelle found in nearly all animal cells. They are spherical vesicles which contain hydrolytic enzymes that can break down many kinds of biomolecules. Simply stated, a lysosome is a type of vesicle with specific composition, of both its membrane proteins, and proteins of its lumen.

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wow Lucy, never heard of that word

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Thank you, Lucy! I have heard of the word lysosome, but I couldn't have told you where I had heard it or what it meant.

I doubt I will use it in conversation either. emoticon

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I know I could not use that in conversation, as I have never heard that one before, Lucy! emoticon

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popinjay
 
noun | PAH-pin-jay
 
Definition:

a strutting supercilious person




Did You Know?
 
Popinjays and parrots are birds of a feather. Popinjay, from the Middle French word papegai, is the original name for a parrot in English. The French word, in turn, came from the Arabic word for the bird, babghā’. Parrot, which English speakers adopted later, is probably a modification of the Middle French perroquet, which is also the source of the English parakeet. In the days of Middle English, parrots were rare and exotic, and it was quite a compliment to be called a popinjay after such a beautiful bird. But by the 1500s, parrots had become more commonplace, and their gaudy plumage and vulgar mimicry helped popinjay develop the pejorative sense we use today.

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