Runboard.com
You're welcome.

runboard.com       


 
HappyGeezer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Top of the page

Registered: 01-2009
Location: Southern NewEngland
Posts: 16119
Reply | Quote
British words converted to American


This is only a quick list, you'll have to Google search for the origin of a particular word.

[sign in to see URL]




---


9/8/2011, 8:57 am Link to this post Send Email to HappyGeezer   Send PM to HappyGeezer Blog
 
Susa Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

ιδιοκτήτης
Top of the page
Premium User



Registered: 07-2006
Location: Oχάιο
Posts: 69859
Reply | Quote
Re:


        ACCOMMODATION in the sense of lodging is singular in English and plural in American English
        ADMIRALTY in Britain is the Navy Department in the U.S.
        AGRICULTURAL SHOW is a State or County Fair.
        AIRY-FAIRY means superficial in a disparaging sense and is roughly "fanciful"
        ALLOTMENT is a small rented area for growing vegetables or flowers away from you home.
        ANORAK is an Eskimo word for a windbreaker or parka.
        ANTI-CLOCKWISE is counter clockwise.
        ARTICULATED LORRY is a trailer truck.
        ASSISTANT - short for shop assistant - would be a salesclerk.
        AU PAIR is a foreign girl who lives as one of the family in return for helping with the children. Enables "foreign" girls to learn English in a family environment.
        AUBERGINE is an EGGPLANT
        BACKBENCHERS is a Member of the House of Commons who is not the Minister.
        BAD PATCH means a rough time
        BAGS OF is slang and means piles of - usually referring to money.
        BALACLAVA is a woolen helmet named after the site of a battle in the Crimean War
        BANGER is slang for a sausage
        BANK HOLIDAY is a LEGAL HOLIDAY in the U.S. Apart from Xmas they are all different in Britain
        BARGE POLE is a colloquialism for a ten-foot-pole
        BARRACK is to demonstrate noisily in public e.g. as in 'boo'
        BARRISTER is a TRIAL LAWYER
        BASH is to hit as in 'bang'
        BATH in Britain becomes BATHTUB in the US
        BATH OLIVER is a dry biscuit eaten with cheese
        BBC the British Broadcasting Corporation
        BEARSKIN is a high, black fur hat worn by Guardsmen
        BELT UP is slang for shut up
        BILL is what one asks the waiter for and in the US becomes CHECK
        BIRD is slang for 'girl' although in the US DAME would be closer
        BIRO is a ball-point pen
        BISCUIT is a CRACKER or a COOKIE
        BIT used where Americans would say "part"
        BITTER is a type of beer
        BLACK TIE is Mess dress or tuxedo
        BLOCK OF FLATS is an apartment building or high-rise tower block, or a large house converted to flats
        BLOKE slang for man
        BOBBY is a police officer
        BOG toilet
        BOG-ROLL toilet roll
        BOILER is the furnace
        BOLLARDS are barrels
        BONNET is HOOD when referring to your car
        BOOK as a verb to reserve rooms or theater seats
        BOOT is the TRUNK of your car
        BOOT SALE is a flea market or yard sale
        BOX television
        BOXING DAY is the first week-day after Christmas
        BRACES are SUSPENDERS which as an English word means GARTERS
        BRASS PLATE is the equivalent of a SHINGLE
        BUBBLES & SQUEAK is cooked cabbage and potatoes combined and fried
        BUILDING SOCIETY is a savings and loan
        BUMBAG is the same as our fanny pack
        BUNGALOW is a single story house detached house
        BUREAU is a writing desk with drawers and a lift-down flap
        CAB-RANK is a taxi-stand
        CALL-BOX is a telephone booth
        CAMIKNICKERS are teddies
        CAMP BED is a COT which in Britain is used for a baby's CRIB
        CANDYFLOSS is cotton candy
        CARAVAN is a trailer
        CAR PARK is a parking lot
        CASHIER is a TELLER
        CALICO is muslin
        CALOR GAS is bottled gas
        CASTOR SUGAR is finer than granulated sugar but not as fine as icing-sugar
        CATS EYES are surface road reflectors
        CHAR is slang for tea - the drink
        CHAT UP is slang for handling someone a line especially to get to know a girl
        CHEERS thanks; also used as a toast before drinking; also, "see you later"
        CHEMIST is a DRUG-STORE
        CHESTERFIELD is a sofa
        CHIPS are FRENCH FRIES
        CLINGFILM is Saran wrap
        CLOAKROOM is a half bath
        COACHES are buses
        COFFEE, WHITE, WITHOUT is coffee, cream, no sugar
        COLLEAGUE is a co-worker
        CONVENIENCE is a REST ROOM
        CONVEYANCING is buying or selling properties
        COOKER is a stove
        CORNFLOUR is cornstarch
        COSTUME is a swimsuit
        COURGETTE is a ZUCCHINI
        COT is a small child's bed or crib
        COTTAGE traditionally a pretty, quaint house in the country, perhaps with a thatched roof (although the name is stretched nowadays to encompass almost anything except a flat), may be detached or terraced
        COVER NOTE is an Insurance binder
        CRACKING great ("What a cracking bird!")
        CRICKET is a ball game to which Americans have no equal
        CRISPS are potato chips
        CUPBOARD in Britain is CLOSET in the US
        CURRENT ACCOUNT at a bank is a CHECKING ACCOUNT
        C.V. (CURRICULUM VITAE) is a resume
        DAME in Britain refers to a lady who has been knighted
        DAY-RETURN means a ROUND-TRIP ticket usually on the railway
        DEMERAEA sugar is the brown sugar usually on the tables in pubs, not at all like our baking brown sugar
        DETACHED is a house that stands alone, usually with its own garden
        DEVIATION is a detour
        DIARY is our calendar/date or appointment book
        DINNER JACKET is a TUXEDO
        DORMITORY is a multiple bedroom usually found in boarding schools and is NOT a barracks
        DRAUGHTS is the game of CHECKERS
        DRESS CIRCLE in the theater is the FIRST BALCONY
        DRESSING TABLE is the equivalent of the American DRESSER
        DRESSING GOWN is a ROBE or bathrobe
        DUAL CARRIAGEWAY is a DIVIDED HIGHWAY
        DUMMY is a pacifier
        DUSTBIN is a GARBAGE CAN
        DUSTMAN is a garbage collector
        DUVET is a eiderdown quilt
        EARLY-CLOSING is an infuriating custom of shops closing one afternoon a week
        EARTH as a verb and as an electrical term equals to GROUND a wire
        ELASTOPLAST is BAND-AID
        ELEVEN is a FOOTBALL or CRICKET TEAM (from the number of players)
        ENGAGED is what the operator says when the telephone line is BUSY
        ERNIE is 'electronic random number indicator equipment' and selects Premium Bond winners
        ESTATE AGENT is a REAL-ESTATE BROKER
        ESTATE CAR is a STATION WAGON
        EX-DIRECTORY is a UNLISTED TELEPHONE NUMBER
        EX-SERVICE MAN is a VETERAN
        FAG is a cigarette
        FANCY DRESS is costumes
        FANCY DRESS PARTY is a costumes party
        FEN is swampland or marsh
        FIRST FLOOR in a building is SECOND-FLOOR in the US
        FISH-FINGERS are FISH-STICKS
        FITTED applied to carpets means WALL-TO-WALL
        FIZZY DRINK is pop/soda
        FLAN is an open sponge or pastry case with a fruit or sweet filling
        FLANNEL is a face-cloth
        FLAT is an APARTMENT usually one floor
        FLEET STREET is a colloquialism for the PRESS
        FLEX is an electric cord
        FLY-OVER is an over-pass
        FOOTBALL is rugby, not American football
        FORTNIGHT means two weeks or fourteen nights
        FREE HOUSE associated with a Pub means it can sell any brand of beer it wishes, it is not linked to any specific brewery
        FRINGE (HAIR) is BANGS
        FULL STOP is the black dot at the end of a sentence called in the US a period
        GAMMON is ham
        GARDEN is the property outside a house which in the US is a YARD
        GATEAU is a type of layer cake
        GEARBOX is TRANSMISSION
        GEAR-LEVER is GEARSHIFT
        GEORDIE (pronounced JORDY) is a native of Tyneside and also the dialect he speaks
        GEYSER (GEEZER) is a water heater
        GIVE-WAY as a road sign means YIELD
        GLASS is CRYSTAL
        GONGS are slang for military medals
        GOVERNMENT means administration and refers to the people currently running the country
        GENERAL PRACTITIONER (GP) is a internist or doctor
        GREASPROOF PAPER is wax paper
        GREEN BELT is a no-building zone around a town or city
        GREENGROCER is a fruit/vegetable store
        GRILL as a verb is to BROIL
        GUILLOTINE is a paper-cutter
        GUMBOOTS are rubber boots
        GUMSHIELD is the same as a mouthgaurd
        GYMKHANA is a local Horse Show
        GYM SHOES are SNEAKERS
        HABERDASHERY is pins, needles, ribbons, thread etc. : and is what you ask for in a shop
        HAGGIS a traditional Scottish dish made from a sheep's inside
        HAIRDRESSER is a man or women's 'barber shop' or 'beauty shop'
        HAIRSLIDE is a barrette
        "HALF" when addressed to a bar-tender means a half-pint of beer
        HALF-TERM is a mid-term vacation of short duration
        HARD CHEESE is tough luck
        HAT TRICK is a cricket term for taking three wickets by three successive balls but it is often to any triple triumph
        HAVE-A-BASH means give it a try
        HAVE NO TIME FOR means to have a low opinion
        HESSIAN is burlap
        HIGH STREET preceded by 'the', is the American Main Street
        HIGH TEA served late in the afternoon usually contains a cooked item such as eggs or sausages - this is not to be confused with 'tea' or 'afternoon tea' which is merely a cup of tea with a cake or very small sandwich
        HIRE PURCHASE is to buy on an installment plan
        HOB is an installed gas, electric range top
        HOLIDAY is a vacation although the university still uses vacation for the time after term finishes
        HOMELY is simple or unpretentious and not the 'ugly' meant in America
        HOOD of a car is known as 'BONNET' in England but of a cloak or coat is still the same
        HOUSEMAN in a hospital is a doctor or 'intern' in America
        HOOVER is to vacuum
        HUNDREDWEIGHT is 112 pounds and 20 Hundredweight are in 1 ton
        HUNT an Englishman hunts fox or deer but shoots game birds or rabbits
        ICE on menus means ice-cream
        ICING SUGAR is similar to our powdered sugar
        IMMERSION TANK is a hot water heater in a house
        INTERVAL is an intermission
        IN TRAIN means coming along as in 'the work is progressing'
        IRONMONGER is a hardware shop
        JAB is a shot or immunization
        JAM is what Americans would call jelly
        JELLY is what they call Jell-O
        JERSEY is a sweater
        JOINT (of meat) as in Sunday Joint is a piece of roast meat
        JUMBLE SALE is a rummage sale
        JUMPER is a sweater (or woolly, or jersey), the American 'jumper' is a pinafore dress
        JUNCTION is an interchange on motorway
        KEDGEREE is a dish of fish, rice and eggs and often served at breakfast
        KETTLE (FOR HOB) is a tea kettle
        KIOSK can be a news-stand or a telephone box
        KIP sleep ("I could do with a kip" or "He's kipping on the sofa.")
        KITCHEN PAPER is paper towels
        KNAVE is a jack in playing cards
        KNICKERS underwear for women
        KNOCK BACK DOUGH is to punch down dough
        KNICKERS are ladies' underpants
        'L' plates are large red 'L's which a person learning to drive must put on his car
        LACQUER is hair-spray
        LADDER in a stocking is a 'run' in America
        LADYBIRD is a lady bug
        LAGER is beer
        LANDLORD in a pub is the inn-keeper
        LARDER is a pantry
        LAY A TABLE is to set the table
        LAY-BY is a roadside parking area at the side of the road
        LEADER can be a newspaper editorial, the leading counsel of a team of lawyers or the first violinist in an orchestra but NOT the conductor as is popular in America
        LEMONADE is Sprite, 7UP
        LETTER-BOX is a mail-box
        LEVEL-CROSSING is a grade crossing
        LIFE GUARD is a member of a regiment of the Royal Household Cavalry
        LIFT is an elevator
        LINE on a railway means track
        LOO can be an 18th century card game or a lavatory or bathroom or whatever you wish to say
        LORRY is a truck
        LOUNGE SUIT is a business and NOT clothes for lounging in
        MAC is an abbreviation for macintosh or raincoat
        MAKING CONTACTS is networking
        MAGISTRATE is very close to a justice of the peace
        MAINS is an electric circuit box
        MAISONETTE is an apartment on 2 or more floors
        MAJORITY as a voting term this equals a 'plurality' in American terms
        MANCUNIAN is someone from Manchester
        MANGETOUT are snow peas
        MARKET many towns have a weekly market day with wares on stalls (booths) in the open air - the right to do so goes back hundreds of years & the AA book lists them all - so does a list available from my office
        MARROW is a very large zucchini
        MARTINI is vermouth - if you want a Dry Martini ash for a Gin & French
        MASH is mashed potatoes
        MATCH is what two sides play on a sports field and is equal to an American game
        MEAN is tight-fisted or stingy as opposed to the American 'cruel' or ill-tempered
        MEWS HOUSE is a hose that's converted from old stables or servants' lodging (usually 17th or 19th century) and is the town equivalent of a genuine cottage
        MINCE or MINCED MEAT from the butcher is chopped meat of hamburger however MINCEMEAT is chopped apples, raisins etc. Which goes into a mince pie
        MOOR is open land often with heather
        MOTORWAY is a Freeway
        MORNING TEA is often served in your hotel room before you go down to breakfast
        MUFFIN is a small, spongy cake served toasted and buttered - do NOT confuse with the American 'English Muffin' which does not exist in England.
        MUSLIN is cheesecloth in America but American 'muslin' is calico in England
        NAFF tacky
        NANNY is a child's nurse
        NAPPY, a corruption of napkin, is a diaper
        NETS are sheer curtains
        NEWSAGENT shop selling newspapers
        NOTECASE is a billfold
        NO ENTRY is wrong way (traffic sign)
        NO OVERTAKING is no passing
        NOTICEBOARD is a bulletin board
        NUMBER PLATE is a license plate
        OFF HIS ROCKER is out to lunch
        OFF LICENSE is a shop which can sell alcohol all day but it must be taken away or consumed 'off' the premises
        OFF-THE-PEG refers to 'ready-to-wear' clothes
        OPHTHALMIC OPTICIAN test eyesight, prescribe glasses, and diagnose eye diseases
        OPHTHALMIC MEDICAL PRACTITIONER treats eye diseases, test eyesight, prescribes lenses
        OUT OF BOUNDS is equivalent to the American term 'off-limits'
        OVERLEAF is the reverse side of a page as is [sign in to see URL]. (please turn over)
        OVERTAKE is a driving term meaning to pass another car
        OXBRIDGE is a portmanteau word for the ancient universities of Oxford and Cambridge
        P45 is a pink slip
        PANDA CAR is a small police car
        PANTOMINE has no American equivalent and is an English Christmas entertainment based on a fairy-tale with a lot of modern singing, dancing and humor - it is not mime
        PANTS are underpants in American - the English equivalent of American pants is trousers
        PARAFFIN is kerosene - American 'paraffin' is paraffin wax or white wax
        PASTRY CASE is a pie crust
        PASTY is an individual pie as in Cornish Pasty
        PAVEMENT is sidewalk
        PERAMBULATOR shortened usually to 'pram' is a baby-carriage
        PETROL is gasoline
        PILLAR BOX or POST BOX is a mail-box and its painted red not blue
        PLAIT is a braid when applied to girls' hair
        PLASTER is a band-aid
        PLIMSOLLS are shoes such as American deckshoes
        PLONK (SLANG) is wine
        PORRIDGE is oatmeal
        POLYFILLA is spackle compound
        POPPERS are snaps
        PUDDINGS (the term) can be used to group all desserts whether it is cake, pie, ice-cream, custards. British puddings are not like our custard type "Jell-O" pudding
        PRANG (in a car) is a fender bender
        PREMIUM BOND is a Government Lottery Bond which has no interest
        PROVISION is accrual
        PUB is a public house which is a bar with an English atmosphere which cannot be defined in this small space - go an see one
        PUB WITH ROOMS - is similar to an inn
        PUSH-CHAIR is a child's stroller
        PYLON is a high tension tower
        QUEUE as a verb it means to stand in line - and woe betide you if you cut in
        QUID (slang) is a one pound note
        RED INDIAN means an American Indian - 'Indian' alone means a native of India
        REDUNDANT is to be released from a job
        REEL is a spool
        REFUSE COLLECTOR is a garbage man
        REGISTER OFFICE is a marriage clerk's office
        REMEMBRANCE DAY is November 11 or the nearest Sunday and is Veteran Day in America
        RESIDENT is the name for a person registered at a hotel
        RETURN TICKET is a round-trip ticket on a train or bus
        RING ROAD is a circular route around a town
        RING UP is to telephone
        ROAD WORKERS is road construction or road repair
        ROUNDABOUT is a traffic control or a merry-go-round
        RUBBISH is garbage
        RUCKSACK is a backpack
        RUNNER BEANS are string beans
        SACK is to be fired from a job
        SCONE is an American soda biscuit and its eaten with butter and often jam and cream
        SCOTCH EGG is a hard-boiled egg in sausage meat
        SELLOTAPE is scotchtape
        SEMI-DETACHED is a duplex or two-family house
        SEND DOWN means to expel from University although it may indicate only a temporary absence
        SERVIETTE is a napkin
        SHANDY is a drink made from beer and lemonade
        SHEPHERD'S PIE is a dish made from minced beef and potatoes
        SILENCER of a car is the muffler
        SISTER in a hospital is the head nurse of a ward
        SLAP-UP four-star, excellent-refers to food
        SLATE is to express a harsh criticism
        SLIPROAD onto a motorway is a ramp
        SOLICITOR is an attorney
        SPONGE BAG is a toilet kit
        SPONGE FINGER is a long, soft, sweet cake or 'lady-finger'
        SPROUTS is Brussels sprouts
        SQUASH is a fruit drink
        STALL in a market is a 'booth' but in a theater is an orchestra seat
        STARTER is an appetizer
        STONE referring to weight is 14 pounds
        SUBWAY is a pedestrian underpass
        SUMMERTIME is when daylight saving time is in effect
        SUPER means 'terrific' i.e. splendid
        SURGICAL SPIRIT is rubbing alcohol
        SURGERY is a doctor's office
        SUSPENDERS are garters
        SWEETS are candy
        SWISS ROLL is a jelly roll
        TA informal thank you
        TABLE the verb means to submit for discussion (the reverse of its American meaning)
        TAILBACK is a line of traffic
        TAKEAWAY is carryout
        TALLBOY is a highboy
        TAP is faucet
        TARMAC is pavement
        TATTY is shabby
        TEAT is a nipple for baby's bottle
        TERM is one of the three educational parts of the year - roughly like a semester
        TERRACE HOUSES is a row of 3 or more usually 2 or 3 stories high
        THEATRE in a hospital is the operating room
        THIRD PARTY INSURANCE is liability insurance
        TIGHTS are pantyhose
        TIN as a food container is a can
        TOAD-IN-A-HOLE is a dish of sausage 'bangers' in batter
        TO PINCH is to steal
        TORCH flashlight
        TORY is a member of the Conservative party
        TRAINERS are sneakers
        TROUSERS are slacks
        TUBE in the subway
        TWEE is arty
        UNDERDONE referring to meat is rare
        VACUUM FLASK is a thermos bottle
        VAN is a small truck
        VAT is Value-Added Tax. Similar to sales tax in the states
        VERGE (OF ROAD) is the shoulder
        VEST is an undershirt in Britain not the American meaning of a 'waistcoat'
        VILLAGE is a small town without a mayor and usually with under 3,000 people. In the UK can be a handful of houses with a church and a pub, or a larger settlement with shops and community center
        WASHING UP LIQUID is dishwashing liquid
        WASHING UP POWDER is laundry soap
        WC stands for "water closet", in other words, the toilet
        WELLINGTONS are rubber boots named after the Duke of Wellington
        WHISKY is Scotch
        WHISKEY is Irish
        WHITEHALL is a collective word referring to the government because so many government offices are located around the road
        WHITE SPIRIT is alcohol
        WINDSCREEN is a windshield
        WING of a car is the fender
        WIRELESS is the original term for radio and is often used by older people
        WOOLLY is a sweater
        WRITTEN OFF (CAR) is "totalled"
        ZEBRA CROSSING is a striped pedestrian crossing
        ZED is the letter 'z' (or "zee" as pronounced in American English)



---


SS eH PF
9/8/2011, 9:04 am Link to this post Send PM to Susa Blog
 
Susa Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

ιδιοκτήτης
Top of the page
Premium User



Registered: 07-2006
Location: Oχάιο
Posts: 69859
Reply | Quote
Re:


 I thought I would also put the list here in case that site ever goes defunct.

 :thuUp Thank you, HG!

---


SS eH PF
9/8/2011, 9:05 am Link to this post Send PM to Susa Blog
 
HappyGeezer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Top of the page

Registered: 01-2009
Location: Southern NewEngland
Posts: 16119
Reply | Quote
Re: British words converted to American


Good idea, Susa, thanks.

I thought it would be too much to post, guess not, afterall it's only text data.




---


9/8/2011, 10:05 am Link to this post Send Email to HappyGeezer   Send PM to HappyGeezer Blog
 
RoyEdG Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info

Mr. Piano Man
Top of the page
Premium User


Registered: 08-2011
Location: Ohio, USA
Posts: 2513
Reply | Quote
Re: British words converted to American


Good reference :thuUp
I copied and pasted it to my 'files' so I can have a better understanding of what Nanny is talking about.
It is certainly interesting to see how another culture relates to things !!!

---
"Folks are usually about as happy as they make their minds up to be " - Abraham Lincoln
9/8/2011, 1:38 pm Link to this post Send Email to RoyEdG   Send PM to RoyEdG Blog
 
HappyGeezer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Top of the page

Registered: 01-2009
Location: Southern NewEngland
Posts: 16119
Reply | Quote
Re: British words converted to American


Did you notice, Roy, that some British words have the same meaning in American English? Those words were either borrowed or brought to America by the British immigrates.


 

---


9/8/2011, 6:39 pm Link to this post Send Email to HappyGeezer   Send PM to HappyGeezer Blog
 
HappyGeezer Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info


Top of the page

Registered: 01-2009
Location: Southern NewEngland
Posts: 16119
Reply | Quote
Re: British words converted to American


I'll add another that's a favored use by Nanny.

She says this when she doesn't quite understand what I said to her. Be it an explanation or something just plain silly. emoticon
I love her responses.

"Micky" - Eg: "Are you pulling out my Micky?"

Meaning; tease, making fun of, ridicule; American example: "Are you pulling my leg?". :laugh

 

---


9/8/2011, 7:54 pm Link to this post Send Email to HappyGeezer   Send PM to HappyGeezer Blog
 


Add a reply






You are not logged in (login)