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Pauline, geek in training
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oh yes, I know placate.
I like this thread Susan..

come on Marjie! emoticon

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Pauline, geek in training
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I am re reading the Celestine books

synchonisity... I like that word,, have I spelt it correctly.. or should that be spelled?

spelt is a kind of flour innit?

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ιδιοκτήτης
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Re: Fabulous new words . . . or old words


Officinal

 
adjective | uh-FISS-uh-nul
 
Definition:
tending or used to cure disease or relieve pain : medicinal



Did You Know?
 
Officinal is a word applied in medicine to plants and herbs that are used in medicinal preparations. For most of the 19th century, it was the standard word used by the United States Pharmacopeia to refer to the drugs, chemicals, and medicinal preparations that they recognized, but by the 1870s it was replaced by official in this context. Despite this supersession, you still can find a healthy dose of officinal in the pharmaceutical field, where it is used today as a word describing preparations that are regularly kept in stock at pharmacies. Officinal was derived from the Medieval Latin noun officina, a word for the storeroom of a monastery in which provisions and medicines were kept. In Latin, officina means "workshop."
 

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Pauline, geek in training
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oh never heard of that word Susan

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Re: Fabulous new words . . . or old words


deride

de·ride
dəˈrīd/Submit
verb
3rd person present: derides
express contempt for; ridicule.
"critics derided the proposals as clumsy attempts to find a solution"
synonyms: ridicule, mock, scoff at, jibe at, make fun of, poke fun at, laugh at, hold up to ridicule.

I have been reading this all [sign in to see URL] had to look it up, I've never heard it. emoticon

Nanny, I could NOT have spelled your word! emoticon
But I looked it up, because I KNOW that one! emoticon

Synchronicity (German: Synchronizität) is a concept, first introduced by analytical psychologist Carl Jung, which holds that events are "meaningful coincidences" if they occur with no causal relationship yet seem to be meaningfully related

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✴ Birthplace: Earth ✴ Race: Human ✴ Politics: Freedom ✴ Religion: Love♥

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Deride! I have heard of that one and basically knew what it meant but would have been afraid to try it in conversation

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synchronicity
noun syn·chro·nic·i·ty ˌsiŋ-krə-ˈni-sə-tē , ˌsin-

1 : the quality or fact of being synchronous
2 : the coincidental occurrence of events and especially psychic events (such as similar thoughts in widely separated persons or a mental image of an unexpected event before it happens) that seem related but are not explained by conventional mechanisms of causality —used especially in the psychology of C. G. Jung


Did You Know?
It happens to everyone sooner or later: A certain number pops up wherever you go; an old friend you haven't seen in 20 years since high school appears the same day you're looking at her picture in a yearbook; you're singing a song and turn on the radio - and the same song is playing. Such coincidences, here described by Thomas Ropp in the Arizona Republic, March 29,1999, are examples of synchronicity. The concept is linked to the psychology of Carl Jung. Jung didn't coin the word (the "simultaneousness" sense of "synchronicity" was already in use), but he gave it special importance in his writings. Jung believed that such "meaningful coincidences" play an important role in our lives. Today, some people even look to synchronicities for spiritual guidance.



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Pauline, geek in training
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Re: Fabulous new words . . . or old words


I know deride.

I love synchronisty!

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Re: Fabulous new words . . . or old words


cohort
 
noun | KOH-hort
 
Definition
 
1 :
companion, colleague
 
2
a :
band, group
 
b :
a group of individuals having a statistical factor (such as age or class membership) in common in a demographic study
 
c :
one of 10 divisions of an ancient Roman legion
 
d :
a group of warriors or soldiers




Did You Know?
 
In ancient times, a cohort was a military unit, one of ten divisions in a Roman legion. The term passed into English in the 15th century, when it was used in translations and writings about Roman history. Once cohort became established in our language, its meaning was extended, first to refer to any body of troops, then to any group of individuals with something in common, and later to a single companion. Some usage commentators have objected to this last sense because it can be hard to tell whether the plural refers to different individuals or different groups. The "companion" sense is well established in standard use, however, and its meaning is clear enough in such sentences as "her cohorts came along with her to the game."


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This is a word I know and use.

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Pauline, geek in training
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cohorts, well I would have used that in a derisory way

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I always think of a cohort as a partner in crime. CJ would probably be my cohort. emoticon

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Re: Fabulous new words . . . or old words


Financial and synchronicity are both new to me.

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Pauline, geek in training
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Re: Fabulous new words . . . or old words


grotty

I heard this on BBC tv this am.

I thought it was more of a slang word, and was going to say as such.. that lots of slang words my gks do not understand..

apparently it may not be termed as slang.


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Re: Fabulous new words . . . or old words


quote:

Lucy Ashes wrote:
Financial and synchronicity are both new to me.


Lucy, did you mean "Officinal?"

I'm sure you must have heard of the word, "Financial." Perhaps, a spellcheck type program "fixed" the word for you?

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